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Oct 27th, 2017: SNEKs

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Mark Laita is a long time photographer fascinated by the shapes and colors of snakes, preferably just
after shedding when the colors are most vibrant.



Quote:

Handlers assisted him in laying each snake on a piece of black velvet, which slowed these fast movers enough to grab the photographs. The dark background also allowed the eye to focus on the form, texture, and color of the species. “By putting it on a black background, it removes all of the variables. It makes it just about the snake,” shared Laita. “If it is a red snake in the shape of a figure eight, all you have is this red swipe of color.”


Quote:

While photographing a black mamba at a facility in Central America, the deadly snake struck. “It was a very docile snake,” he recalls. “It just happened to move close to my feet at some point. The handler brought his hook in to move the snake, and he inadvertently snagged the cord from my camera. That scared the snake, and then it struck where it was warm. That happened to be the artery in my calf.” Miraculously, though the blood soaked through his socks and shoes, he survived the bite.


Quote:

Considering the black mamba's venom is deadly and can potentially make a person collapse within 45 minutes, Laita is extremely lucky. In fact, he was so preoccupied with the shoot, he didn't realize he'd been bitten until the handler told him. After 20 minutes of feeling ok, he decided not to seek medical attention—something herpetologists later told him was a big mistake because something could have happened even hours later. It was only the next day he realized he'd actually snapped a photograph of the bite as it occurred.
When will people realize sneks are sneaky, slimy, agents of Evil from Hell. :smack:
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samuel
12 days ago
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Omg
The Haight in San Francisco
superlopuh
11 days ago
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skittone
11 days ago
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That guy was luuuuuucky!

‘Inside the Great Poop Emoji Feud’

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Charlie Warzel, reporting for BuzzFeed:

The debate appears to be between some of Unicode’s most prolific contributors and typographers (Unicode was initially established to develop standards for translating alphabets into code that can be read across all computers and operating systems), and those in the consortium who focus primarily on the evolution of emojis. The two chief critics — Michael Everson and Andrew West, both typographers — say that the emoji proposal process has become too commercial and frivolous, thereby cheapening the Unicode Consortium’s long body of work.

Their argument centers around “Frowning Pile Of Poo,” one of the emojis under consideration for the June 2018 class. In an Oct. 22 memo to the Unicode Technical Committee, Everson tore into the committee over the submission calling it “damaging … to the Unicode standard.”

“Organic waste isn’t cute,” Everson wrote, aghast that the technical committee would even deign to consider additional excremoji. “It is bad enough that the [Emoji Subcommittee] came up with it, but it beggars belief that the [Unicode Technical Committee] actually approved it,” he wrote. Everson continued:

“The idea that our 5 committees would sanction further cute graphic characters based on this should embarrass absolutely everyone who votes yes on such an excrescence. Will we have a CRYING PILE OF POO next? PILE OF POO WITH TONGUE STICKING OUT? PILE OF POO WITH QUESTION MARKS FOR EYES? PILE OF POO WITH KARAOKE MIC? Will we have to encode a neutral FACELESS PILE OF POO?”

I’m all for taking most of the Unicode Consortium’s work deliberately and seriously, but emoji are inherently frivolous. The frivolity of emoji is why they’re so sensationally popular.

Also, Simon Willison:

I love how the fact that unicode chars are referred to by their name IN CAPS makes everyone seem even more angry.

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superlopuh
16 days ago
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Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Listening

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Click here to go see the bonus panel!

Hovertext:
Back in my day, we only gave corporations 70 percent of our data, and that's the way we liked it!

New comic!
Today's News:
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superlopuh
159 days ago
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Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Epsilon

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Click here to go see the bonus panel!

Hovertext:
That's actually the calculus teacher's assigned uniform.

New comic!
Today's News:
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superlopuh
174 days ago
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fxer
173 days ago
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Seems derivative
Bend, Oregon

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - A Funny Universe

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Hovertext: In order to have that one Monty Python sketch about a dead parrot, you must first invent mortality.


New comic!
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superlopuh
244 days ago
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llucax
652 days ago
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So mortality is Monty Python's fault!
Berlin
rclatterbuck
653 days ago
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Entropy permits jokes.
qengho
653 days ago
I'm pretty sure the "chicken-cross-the-road" joke is a pun. If it's successful, it's on the other side of the road. If the road is perilous, The Other Side is the afterlife.
norb
653 days ago
Wish I could star a reply, cause that one is genius, qengho.
Xeronos
653 days ago
I also wish I coudl star a reply because I would star your reply and qengho's.
zippy72
649 days ago
43 years and now I think I finally get the chicken crossing the road joke!

How WWII Jeeps Were Crated for Shipping

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During World War II, America cranked out some 640,000 Jeeps produced by both Willys-Overland and Ford. Once assembled, they could be stacked for transport with the assistance of intermediary pallets:

However, to get them onto ships for transport across the Atlantic and Pacific, they were broken down and crated for greater space efficiency. Look how small they were able to get these crates:

Now you know why the windshields were designed to be folded down.

The color photos are obviously of replicas. The giveaway is the American knock-off of the German "jerry-can" design, which would not appear until late into the war.

Here's a video that shows both original production footage from the 1940s, as well as two modern-day mechanics assembling one of the replicas:

An even more impressive demonstration is below. Watch these fellows at a Jeep festival completely tear the car down—and put it back together—in under four minutes:

I had a devil of a time tracking down where these replicas are produced, but it appears that they're manufactured by Philippines-based fabrication firm MD Juan and distributed by the France-based Jeep Village company that produced the first video above.

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superlopuh
247 days ago
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